In this lecture we looked at magazines, and the magazine industry, discussing semiotic analysis, Readership, Markets and understanding the potential audience for are work.

“When investigating a whole text like a magazine, we will need to think about how the process of reading the magazine effects the meanings of the signs which are used. We will need to ask how far polysemy, the multiple meanings of signs, is limited by the context and interrelationships of signs with each other.” [1]

Semiotic Analysis Of Magazines

* Magazines construct signs to communicate social meanings for their readers.

* These signs relate to an ideology that appears natural in the context of the magazine.

* The ideology that the magazine constructs relates to the advertising that the magazine attracts.

Who are the readers?

“The categorisation of readers by age-group or relationship status is used by magazine publishers and advertisers as a shorthand way of indicating the main issues discussed in the magazines editorial material, the kind of readers the magazines are thought to have, and the kinds of products advertised in the magazines.” [2]

A semiotic analysis might reveal that a particular magazine has an (ideal reader) corresponding to the man or woman whose interests are targeted by the magazine, there will also be a large number of (non – ideal) readers, who may not have particular interests that are in line with a publication, For example if a man was to might pick up a Woman’s Fashion Magazine in a Hospital waiting room out of boredom he would be a (non – ideal) reader.

Magazine Markets

* Consumer Magazines

* Business to Business Magazines

* News and Educational Magazines

* In House Journals

* Independent or Alternative magazines

” As in any commercial transaction the sellers attempt to make their wares as attractive as possible.” [3]

Understanding Your Potential Audience

*Who will see your pictures?

i.e What publication is your work for, or being pitched to. Dose your work suit that demographic and is it in fitting with their interests?

*What will they Expect to see?

*What will they not expect to see?

“Photographers’ work is greatly influenced by the relationships they develop with writers and how closely the photographs mirror the word stories.” [4]

Would a reader expect to see your work in this publication? Is it in fitting or dose it stand out as something that isn’t in tune with the rest of the magazine?

*How will you provoke their interests?

Dose your work relate with the interests of the readership? Is it relevant?

” If video captures immediate attention, the still frame is a lasting image. If it defines a story and fixes it in the collective memory…. What people forget, however, is that a picture can mislead as easy as a set of words. When Asian refugees streamed out of Kuwait into Jordan, I went to the boarder each day to write what I saw. Photographers came along with instructions. Sometimes, a distant editor asked for tragic pictures. On other days, he wanted happy ones. (Rosenblum, 1993, p. 93)” [5]

References

[1] Jonathan Bignell – Media Semiotics: An Introduction – 2002 – Manchester England – Manchester University Press – 2nd Edition – Page 55

[2] Jonathan Bignell – Media Semiotics: An Introduction – 2002 – Manchester England – Manchester University Press – 2nd Edition – Page 57

[3] Loup Langton – Photojournalism And Today’s news – 2009 – Sussex England – John Wiley & Sons – 1st Edition – Page 97

[4] Loup Langton – Photojournalism And Today’s news – 2009 – Sussex England – John Wiley & Sons – 1st Edition – Page 105

[5] Loup Langton – Photojournalism And Today’s news – 2009 – Sussex England – John Wiley & Sons – 1st Edition – Page 93

 

 

 

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